EMPLOYEE GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE: NEEDS TO BE LEGALLY BINDING?

Johnny Barnes November 2, 2017 0
EMPLOYEE GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE: NEEDS TO BE LEGALLY BINDING?

There has been a huge commotion in parliament over the last few days. Particularly involving
certain MPs and their overzealous acts of sexual conduct towards women, some of those
working in parliament themselves. This then calls for some sort of solution to fix the issue (or
at least reduce the risk). Theresa May as the PM comes under intense scrutiny for the need
to address the issue. To which she proposed that the code of conduct in parliament should
have some “legal standing” and a contractually binding grievance procedure for all MPs set in
place.

There were allegations made regarding the Tory party, including some senior ministers who Mrs. May
was working closely with in parliament. There were also allegations made towards MPs
from the Labour party. Did May know what was happening? If she did that’s a worrying concern
for the young female professionals, who have been reported to have been victims of these
alleged groping and propositioning incidents. But even then, many leaders lose sight of the
issues on their own team as I’m sure they would expect their team players to uphold the same
values as they do. Well, that clearly wasn’t the case and May is in a huge frenzy to have a
reshuffle of her cabinet.

We’ve been told government officials keep a “black book” of allegations against MPs hidden
away. So that leaves us to question, how long does the list track back from? And why has it
taken this long for these allegations to come into the public consciousness?

What was of shock to me regarding the scandal is that there is a “WhatsApp sex pest group”
that women who include parliamentary researchers, secretaries and aides are all a part of.
Who claim that politicians on both sides of the house have pestered them and given them
lewd nicknames. The code names for some of these MPs in parliament who committed the
acts were described as “Lift Lunger”, “Happy hands” and “Taxi Tickler”. All involved in groping
women in enclosed environments and even in public, which reveals the lack of awareness or
care these perpetrators had for the actions they were partaking in.

The recent allegations have come into fruition in the light of the recent global social media
campaign called #MeToo launched by Alyssa Milano, an American actress at the forefront of
it, who too was a victim of sexual assault. The campaign encourages all women to confront
the men they know, whether their brothers, friends or work colleagues about their attitudes
and behaviours. Thousands of women have come forward sharing their stories since the social
media hashtag was created. No doubt this had huge influence regarding the women in the
political sector to share their own stories, despite huge risk to their careers within parliament.
I say that as MPs hold immense power and as the young employee with a lack of voice
compared to their older counterparts, particularly when female, societies attitudes can be off
putting in believing their reports.

Alyssa Milano, the actress who started the #Metoo
campaign on Twitter

Echoing what Theresa May has proposed in her comments concerning the MPs in the scandal.
The current grievance procedures in government we have regarding employees and their
employer are not legally binding. It’s expected that the employer follows the necessary
guidelines to tackle the problems that may arise through complaints from the employee in the
work environment. But we know this is not always the case and it’s pretty difficult as a young
professional who are the most vulnerable in the workplace, due to their lesser status and lack
of experience. Combining that with being a female in the workplace, it’s an even tougher task
to share your grievances towards your employer, especially one who holds immense powers
in parliament. For a lot of women, they do not bother reporting incidents or if they do, it is not
taken as seriously.

Theresa May’s views on the grievance procedures should be the agenda needed to create
some legalities around the topic. Implementing some sort of policy around the instances of
sexual conduct towards employees and making it legally binding needs to be a course of
action in parliament. It’s a sad shame knowing what it is morally right and wrong cannot be
the indication we need to take complaints of sexual conduct in the workplace more seriously.
It seems when employers are threatened by legal action, they may tend to take matters as an
urgent need for attention rather than sweeping cases under the rug like many in parliament
have been doing to protect the most powerful and senior members of staff. Well this needs a
complete reform and female employees in this case need to know that their issues will be dealt
with accordingly and the relevant persons will not go unpunished. I think it will also be a wakeup
call for those who commit these revolting acts, that there will be repercussions for their
actions. Hopefully, it will also allow them to get the help they need for their habits.

Campaigns such as #Metoo are giving women and (men) the opportunity to voice their stories
more bravely than in the past and help others in the process to share theirs. Building a
community of victims to overpower the perpetrators who inflicted any sort of harassment or
assault towards them. Theresa May, now needs to enforce laws that are contractually binding,
that involve the issue of grievance in parliament and the workplace. That may be just one way
of tackling this ever troubling problem.

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